(By Roger Stone)

I think Juanita Broaddrick is a brave and courageous lady, but Juanita is mistaken when she recently commented that I played “no role” in her appearance at the second Clinton-Trump debate, alongside the Clintons’ other best-known sex-crime victims.

I dedicated my book The Making of the President 2016: How Donald Trump Orchestrated a Revolution to Juanita Broaddrick because I admire her courage and her grace.

Because I did not make the actual arrangements for Juanita and the other Clinton victims [Paula Jones, Kathleen Willey and Kathy Shelton (a Hillary victim)] to attend the debate, it is understandable that Juanita might be unclear about my role in bringing these ladies to the forefront of the national consciousness at a critical moment in the final weeks of the campaign, undoubtedly to Bill Clinton’s mortification, which he skillfully masked.

In short, I am a political strategist, not a campaign advance man. Regardless of who booked their travel and arranged for their admission to the debate, and the like, the idea of highlighting these female Clinton victims and, more importantly, of exposing Hillary’s role in bullying these women into silence, was a strategy I began pushing even before the Trump campaign’s formal launch in early 2015.

A full year before Steve Bannon even joined the Trump campaign, I was well underway in advocating for these women to be given a high profile, including their introduction to a national debate audience.  Prior to the Republican National Convention, I was urging this strategy to newly-installed Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort, as well as to Trump pollster Tony Fabrizio.

Clearly Hillary Clinton’s plan was to capture a disproportionate percentage of women voters based on her specious claims that she is somehow a champion for women. I felt it essential to expose and highlight Hillary’s past as an abuser of women who would psychologically and emotionally rape Bill’s victim’s after he had raped them physically.

I have never claimed that I interfaced with Bill’s victims regarding the specifics of the debate appearances. During the Cleveland convention I discussed the matter over lunch with Breitbart reporter Aaron Klein, whose reporting on Broaddrick’s experience in several incredible interviews with NBC was absolutely stellar.

Both Klein and attorney Candice Jackson, who also wrote a compelling book about Bill’s history of sexual assault and how it impacted the lives of Broaddrick and the others, assured me that these women were willing to attend a debate to face down Bill and Hillary.

Adding to the confusion (or misinformation), David Bossie also erroneously told Fox News that the debate appearance idea was Steve Bannon’s. Given how long it took Bossie and Corey Lewandowski to finally produce their lightweight gossipy book about the Trump Campaign, long after I wrote and published the definitive account in the Making of the President 2016, I am surprised he even remembers what actually went down.

Regardless of these erroneous accounts about the origin and genesis of the Clinton victim debate showcase, I have already supplied an e-mail string that clearly shows how I handed the idea to Steve Bannon weeks ahead of the debate, as reported in The Wrap.

Although Klein is copied on this e-mail string he denies the idea as anyone’s but Bannon’s. Klein’s selective memory in unsurprising given his place on the Breitbart payroll.

Infowars reporter Dr. Jerome Corsi also covered this story, albeit far more thoroughly, in a longer piece that included other corroborating emails.

While this is all largely water under the bridge, it is nonetheless important that the record be set straight when there are those who have set out to muddy it and give credit where credit is most demonstrably NOT due.